Notre Dame researchers collaborate in discovery of potential stroke therapy

Notre Dame researchers collaborate in discovery of potential stroke therapy

Mobashery And Chang At Computer

A study by researchers at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Missouri at Columbia shows in mice that early administration of a potent compound may increase the window of time in which some stroke patients can receive tPA, a therapeutic that dissolves blood clots.

 

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Enzyme in bacteria initiates repair of cell walls damaged by antibiotics

Enzyme in bacteria initiates repair of cell walls damaged by antibiotics

Shahriar Mobashery

Beta-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin, are one of the most widely used class of antibiotics in the world. Though they’ve been in use since the 1940s, scientists still don’t fully understand what happens when this class of drugs encounters bacteria. Now, researchers at the University of Notre Dame have elucidated how an enzyme helps bacteria rebound from damage inflicted by antibiotics not strong enough to immediately kill the bacteria on contact.

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Biophysicist Patricia Clark awarded $1.1M Keck grant for protein folding study

Biophysicist Patricia Clark awarded $1.1M Keck grant for protein folding study

Patricia Clark 250

Patricia Clark, Rev. John Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C., Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, has been awarded a $1.1 million, four-year grant from the W. M. Keck Foundation to develop an innovative approach to replicate in test tubes a universal component of protein folding within cells.

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Smallest-scale work in electrochemistry leads to sizable research strides

Smallest-scale work in electrochemistry leads to sizable research strides

Paul Bohn 250

At a few billionths of a meter, a nanopore is too tiny to see and too tiny to image easily. These miniscule cavities, when created in synthetic materials, are incredibly powerful. One of Notre Dame’s research groups is among the earliest to investigate electron transfer reactions inside nanopores, and therefore was invited to share their insights in a perspective paper published in ACS Central Science.

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Notre Dame study uncovers keys to earliest stages of animal development

Notre Dame study uncovers keys to earliest stages of animal development

Huber Dovichi 250

Research completed at the University of Notre Dame that tracked the maturation of the frog oocyte to an egg, followed by fertilization and progression to the two-cell embryo, provides a valuable foundation for developmental biologists who study the earliest stages of animal development.

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Graduate science and engineering joint annual meeting allows students to share research

Graduate science and engineering joint annual meeting allows students to share research

Cose Jam 250

The graduate joint annual meeting of the College of Science and the College of Engineering (COSE-JAM) drew 45 poster presentations and 14 oral presentations during the event in Jordan Hall on Friday, Dec. 8. The event, similar to the popular undergraduate College of Science Joint Annual Meeting held each year in May, provides graduate and postdoctoral students the opportunity to present their research to their peers as well as to undergraduate students and faculty.

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New protein study broadens knowledge of molecular basis for disease

New protein study broadens knowledge of molecular basis for disease

Patricia Clark 250

Determining how proteins function on a molecular level is crucial to understanding the underlying basis for disease. Now scientists at the University of Notre Dame are one step closer to unraveling the mystery of how intrinsically disordered proteins work, according to new research published in Science.

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