Biophysics, literally the physics of life, enables scientists working at the intersection of physics, biology, chemistry, and applied mathematics and statistics, to collaborate with clinicians, mathematicians and engineers to develop a predictive understanding of biological processes, including cancer, development, infection and the immune system.  Novel tools and techniques now permit biophysicists to see and measure what was once invisible. Physics has long played a prominent role in biology – Watson, Crick and Franklin, discoverers of the structure of DNA, considered themselves biophysicists – but that role has increased dramatically in recent years as the development of new methods has transformed our understanding of biological systems, their complexity and their molecular details.

The University of Notre Dame has a rich history of molecular biophysics research across disciplines. The recent establishment of the new Stavropoulos Center for Interdisciplinary Biophysics will strengthen these efforts across campus, attracting elite research talent at all levels of career development.

News

Harper Hall Center for Investigational Medicine dedication

Harper Hall Center for Investigational Medicine dedication

Phase I: Transforming Dust to Discovery

The pathway from discovery to investigational new drug just got shorter at the Harper Cancer Research Institute.  Due to the generous benefaction of the Harper Family Foundation, the lower level of Harper Hall is undergoing a transformation from a cavernous dirt-floored shell into a state-of-the-art Center for Investigational Medicine

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Soul of a Scientist: New science dean boldly asks the big questions

Soul of a Scientist: New science dean boldly asks the big questions

In 1841, Blessed Basil Anthony Moreau, a French priest and the founder of the Congregation of Holy Cross, sent Rev. Edward Sorin, C.S.C., to the northern end of the Diocese of Vincennes to set up a new school for boys.

Moreau’s educational philosophies, outlined in his 1856 work, “Christian Education,” set his intentions for the study of science at the new university he had a key role in founding the following year — the University of Notre Dame. At a time when many religious were skeptical about how science and theology could co-exist in one institution, his thoughts were clear.…

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