Biophysics, literally the physics of life, enables scientists working at the intersection of physics, biology and chemistry to collaborate with clinicians, mathematicians and engineers to develop a predictive understanding of biological processes, including cancer, development, infection and the immune system.  Novel tools and techniques now permit biophysicists to see and measure what was once invisible. Physics has long played a prominent role in biology – Watson, Crick and Franklin, discoverers of the structure of DNA, considered themselves biophysicists – but that role has increased dramatically in recent years as the development of new methods has transformed our understanding of biological systems, their complexity and their molecular details.

The University of Notre Dame has a rich history of molecular biophysics research across disciplines. The recent establishment of the new Stavropoulos Center for Interdisciplinary Biophysics will strengthen these efforts across campus, attracting elite research talent at all levels of career development.

News

Three Indiana research universities to collaborate with industry to solve critical measurement science challenges in new NSF-funded center

Three Indiana research universities to collaborate with industry to solve critical measurement science challenges in new NSF-funded center

Author: Brandi Wampler

Powering everything from the development of new drugs and medical devices to the detection of dangerous chemicals, measurement science is a multi-billion-dollar industry that is key to both U.S. and international economies. With a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), researchers from the University of Notre Dame, Indiana University, and Purdue University have formed a new center that will work to solve ongoing and emerging industry-relevant challenges in measurement science. 

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New collaboration led by Notre Dame leverages Data Revolution to solve current challenges in chemistry

New collaboration led by Notre Dame leverages Data Revolution to solve current challenges in chemistry

Author: Tammi Freehling

Olaf Wiest 250 pixels square

Olaf Wiest, professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, will direct The Center for Computer-Assisted Synthesis (C-CAS). “This will significantly accelerate progress in drug discovery and materials science where such molecules are critical to fundamental research,” Wiest said.

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Events

ACMS Statistics Seminar: Lynn Lin

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Location: 154 Hurley

Lynn Lin
Penn State University

3:30 PM
154 Hurley Hall

Detecting rare cells in single-cell data for HIV vaccine development

Current vaccine development for HIV has been targeted to induce protective T cells. Clinicians and immunologists rely on single-cell technologies to distinguish and identify functionally distinct T cell responses to vaccination. The ability to efficiently identify these cell subsets, especially the small ones is crucial to decipher system-level biological changes. During this talk, I will first present a new clustering framework names Hidden Markov Model on Variable Blocks (HMM

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