Biophysics, literally the physics of life, enables scientists working at the intersection of physics, biology, chemistry, and applied mathematics and statistics, to collaborate with clinicians, mathematicians and engineers to develop a predictive understanding of biological processes, including cancer, development, infection and the immune system.  Novel tools and techniques now permit biophysicists to see and measure what was once invisible. Physics has long played a prominent role in biology – Watson, Crick and Franklin, discoverers of the structure of DNA, considered themselves biophysicists – but that role has increased dramatically in recent years as the development of new methods has transformed our understanding of biological systems, their complexity and their molecular details.

The University of Notre Dame has a rich history of molecular biophysics research across disciplines. The recent establishment of the Stavropoulos Center for Complex Quantum Matter will strengthen these efforts across campus, attracting elite research talent at all levels of career development.

News

Immeasurable Benefits

Immeasurable Benefits

Author: Jason Kelly '95

If Schnell has a mathematician’s mind, he also has a philosopher’s heart and a theologian’s soul. He distributes a motto for the college on bookmarks: Spes in caelis, pes in terris. Hope in heaven, feet on earth . . .
 
"As a leader, Santiago is actually showing us how to simultaneously be excellent at our individual research fields and, at the same time, move away from compartmentalization of these disciplines," says Notre Dame philosopher of science Nicholas Teh. 'In a way

Read More about Immeasurable Benefits

Too much like us? Researchers uncover key reason a promising cancer therapy is often unsuccessful

Too much like us? Researchers uncover key reason a promising cancer therapy is often unsuccessful

Neoantigens, which are molecules found on tumor cells that incorporate mutations, help our immune system fight cancers and could be the most promising components of future cancer vaccines—if only scientists knew with a high degree of certainty which neoantigens work.

A collaboration of scientists led by Brian Baker

Read More about Too much like us? Researchers uncover key reason a promising cancer therapy is often unsuccessful

Events

No upcoming events at this time.