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Common cholesterol drugs could slow spread of breast cancer to brain

Common cholesterol drugs could slow spread of breast cancer to brain

A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows drugs used to treat high cholesterol could interfere with the way breast cancer cells adapt to the microenvironment in the brain, preventing the cancer from taking hold. Patients with breast cancer who experience this type of metastasis typically survive for only months after the diagnosis.

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Understand and Fight: Notre Dame researchers and the COVID-19 pandemic

Understand and Fight: Notre Dame researchers and the COVID-19 pandemic

The hero in Mary Shelley’s “The Last Man,” her second sweeping political science fiction after “Frankenstein,” is left alone in Rome, in a post-apocalyptic world. A global plague apparently took the lives of everyone else, yet he discerns a duty to forge ahead, no matter what.

Published in 1826, the novel mirrored Shelley’s life as she despaired at the loss of several of her loved ones. Her sister Fanny died by suicide. Her husband, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, drowned after a sailing accident. She lost another friend, the poet Lord Byron, to infection. Two of her toddlers died — one of malaria, and another from a fever. She kept a kind of plague journal, according to Eileen Hunt Botting

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Mary Galvin: It is more meaningful to ask what we can do to end intolerance

Mary Galvin: It is more meaningful to ask what we can do to end intolerance

Mary E. Galvin, William K. Warren Foundation Dean of the College of Science, addressed the issue of inequality with the students, faculty, and staff of the college:

Like many of you, I am deeply saddened by the recent killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery and by this vivid reminder of the racism and inequality that persists throughout our country.…

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