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Graduate student in Biophysics lab among 32 students and alumni who earn NSF fellowships or honorable mentions

Graduate student in Biophysics lab among 32 students and alumni who earn NSF fellowships or honorable mentions

Author: Erin Blasko

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded scholarships to 22 University of Notre Dame students and alumni as part of the 2021 Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP), with an additional 10 students and alumni singled out for honorable mention for the award.

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Notre Dame provost tells US Senate committee STEMM’s lack of women, minority representation hinders American competitiveness

Notre Dame provost tells US Senate committee STEMM’s lack of women, minority representation hinders American competitiveness

Author: Notre Dame News

In testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation on Wednesday (April 14), Marie Lynn Miranda said ensuring America’s national security and global competitiveness for the future requires us to attract more women and underrepresented minorities to STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics and medicine) fields.

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Pandemic is pushing women in STEM ‘past the point of no return’

Pandemic is pushing women in STEM ‘past the point of no return’

Author: Jessica Sieff

During a virtual briefing held by the Women in STEM Caucus and The Science Coalition, Patricia Clark, the Rev. John Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C., Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, said that women in science are being pushed past the point of no return due to the ongoing strain of the COVID-19 pandemic combined with longstanding structural barriers — threatening permanent damage to their careers.

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Researchers find evidence of protein folding at site of  intracellular droplets

Researchers find evidence of protein folding at site of intracellular droplets

Author: Jessica Sieff

In a study published in the journal Chemical Science, researchers at the University of Notre Dame found that elevated concentrations of proteins within the droplets triggered a folding event, increasing the potential for protein aggregation — or misfolding — which has been linked to neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

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Gregory Hartland Receives Prestigious American Chemical Society Award

Gregory Hartland Receives Prestigious American Chemical Society Award

Author: Rebecca Hicks

Gregory Hartland, Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry at the University of Notre Dame, is the 2021 recipient of the American Chemical Society Division of Physical Chemistry Award in Experimental Physical Chemistry. Together with the Kuno group at the University of Notre Dame, the Hartland group has also recently developed a super-resolution IR imaging scheme...

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Hildreth to serve as interim dean, McDowell as interim associate dean of research in the College of Science

Hildreth to serve as interim dean, McDowell as interim associate dean of research in the College of Science

Michael Hildreth, associate dean of research in the College of Science at the University of Notre Dame, will serve as interim dean of the College of Science beginning January 1, 2021. That day, Mary Ann McDowell, associate professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, will begin serving as interim associate dean of research in the college.

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Science and Engineering Scholars Program propels students to success

Science and Engineering Scholars Program propels students to success

“This program is, wow,” said Chelsea Popoola, a math major who plans to attend medical school. The small classes allowed her to learn the material in a tight-knit environment. “I wish I had better words to explain how much this program has done for me. Whenever we need help with anything, there are many people willing to help.”

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WFCDD RFA Request for Applications-Now Open

The Warren Center for Drug Discovery invites new proposals for projects that are associated with drug discovery. In particular, projects associated with small molecule synthesis (libraries or molecular probes), hit validation, lead optimization, mid-sized scale up, assay development, protein purification, and ADMET screening. Any disease areas will be considered. Collaborative opportunities exist for the preparation of small molecules and/or computational-derived drug discovery via three cores: Chemical Synthesis & Drug Discovery, Computer-Aided Molecular Design, or Biological Screening and Development core. …

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Notre Dame launches “Consider This!” a weekly webinar series discussing COVID-19

Notre Dame launches “Consider This!” a weekly webinar series discussing COVID-19

Author: Brandi Wampler

Starting in October, each Monday from 6 to 7 p.m. EST, coronavirus experts will discuss a new aspect or angle of the pandemic, such as epidemiology, food security, public health, racial inequities, testing, vaccines, and evidence used to inform decisions about opening schools, athletics, and businesses. 

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How T-cell targets look in three dimensions may facilitate new cancer vaccines

How T-cell targets look in three dimensions may facilitate new cancer vaccines

T-cells, which hunt for traces of disease within other cells, work by identifying fragments of outsider proteins on a diseased cell’s surface and then go in for the literal kill.

With cancer, some of the mutated fragments of outsider proteins, called neoepitopes, can be recognized by T-cells and are ideal candidates for cancer vaccines. Unfortunately, those candidates are difficult to predict from genetic data alone.

 

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Francis Castellino Receives 2020 ISTH Esteemed Career Award

Francis Castellino Receives 2020 ISTH Esteemed Career Award

Author: Mary Prorok

 

Francis J. Castellino

Francis J. Castellino, Kleiderer-Pezold Professor of Biochemistry and Director of the W.M. Keck Center for Transgene Research, has been selected as a recipient of the 2020 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) Esteemed Career Award. This prestigious award is given to those who “have made significant contributions to the understanding, treatment and diagnosis, research and education in the thrombosis and hemostasis field.” Five recipients are selected annually.

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Common cholesterol drugs could slow spread of breast cancer to brain

Common cholesterol drugs could slow spread of breast cancer to brain

A new study from the University of Notre Dame shows drugs used to treat high cholesterol could interfere with the way breast cancer cells adapt to the microenvironment in the brain, preventing the cancer from taking hold. Patients with breast cancer who experience this type of metastasis typically survive for only months after the diagnosis.

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Understand and Fight: Notre Dame researchers and the COVID-19 pandemic

Understand and Fight: Notre Dame researchers and the COVID-19 pandemic

The hero in Mary Shelley’s “The Last Man,” her second sweeping political science fiction after “Frankenstein,” is left alone in Rome, in a post-apocalyptic world. A global plague apparently took the lives of everyone else, yet he discerns a duty to forge ahead, no matter what.

Published in 1826, the novel mirrored Shelley’s life as she despaired at the loss of several of her loved ones. Her sister Fanny died by suicide. Her husband, the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, drowned after a sailing accident. She lost another friend, the poet Lord Byron, to infection. Two of her toddlers died — one of malaria, and another from a fever. She kept a kind of plague journal, according to Eileen Hunt Botting

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Dean Carlson: letter to graduate students on resolved issues

Author: Andy Fuller

Dear Graduate Students,

Let me start by thanking you for all that you are doing to continue your learning and research through these challenging circumstances.  And, thank you for reaching out to us as you have questions.  We are working through these, and a seemingly endless list of other issues that are unique for this time.  Below I provide an update on the issues that have been resolved.  Please keep asking and bringing to our attention any additional unique needs.  

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