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Biophysics, literally the physics of life, enables scientists working at the intersection of physics, biology and chemistry to collaborate with clinicians, mathematicians and engineers to develop a predictive understanding of biological processes, including cancer, development, infection and the immune system.  Novel tools and techniques now permit biophysicists to see and measure what was once invisible. Physics has long played a prominent role in biology – Watson, Crick and Franklin, discoverers of the structure of DNA, considered themselves biophysicists – but that role has increased dramatically in recent years as the development of new methods has transformed our understanding of biological systems, their complexity and their molecular details.

The University of Notre Dame has a rich history of molecular biophysics research across disciplines. The recent establishment of the new Stavropoulos Center for Interdisciplinary Biophysics will strengthen these efforts across campus, attracting elite research talent at all levels of career development.

Apply Now to the Biophysics PhD program >>>

News

Join Notre Dame Research for the 2017 Core Facility Fair

Join Notre Dame Research for the 2017 Core Facility Fair

Author: Brandi Klingerman

Cff Pic

Notre Dame Research invites faculty, staff, post-doctoral scholars, graduate and undergraduate students, as well as external customers to attend the Core Facility Fair on Wednesday, September 20, 2017. From 12:00 to 4:00 p.m. in the McCourtney Hall B01 Auditorium, attendees will be able to learn how state-of-the-art instrumentation and expertise available via the University of Notre Dame core facilities can help take their research to the next level. 

Read More about Join Notre Dame Research for the 2017 Core Facility Fair

Dr. Jeremy Zartman Awarded Highly Competitive NIH Grant

Dr. Jeremy Zartman Awarded Highly Competitive NIH Grant

Author: Khoa Huynh

Zartman Jeremiah

Dr. Jeremy Zartman, Assistant Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, has been awarded a competitive Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award (MIRA, R35) grant from the National Institutes of Health.  The MIRA program is intended to provide research support for "the nation’s highly talented and promising investigators”.  Zartman’s 5-year grant entitled Regulation and Function of Multicellular Calcium Signaling in Epithelial Growth and Regeneration will support an investigation of impaired cellular calcium signaling, prevalent in many diseases including skin diseases, Alzheimer’s, and metastatic cancer.

Read More about Dr. Jeremy Zartman Awarded Highly Competitive NIH Grant

Events

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Friday, October 13, 2017

Saturday, October 14, 2017